Tag Archives: paprika

Homemade Cheesy Crackers

Katie:  I haven’t posted anything in awhile, but I’ve still found some time between studying and other activities to occasionally try something new.  For my mom’s birthday, I gave her the tough choice of requesting something sweet or salty.  She chose the latter, so I decided to try making some homemade cheesy crackers.  They were much easier to make than I expected, and they turned out great!  I made them as directed, but mixed in some smoked paprika and sprinkled them with sea salt before putting them in the oven.  The pungent smell when they came out of the oven was irresistible!

Cheddar Crackers (adapted from various online sources)

  • 1 cup all-purpose flour
  • 3/4 tsp. salt
  • 1/4 tsp. ground black pepper (optional)
  • 1/2 tsp. smoked paprika (optional)
  • 4 Tbsp. cold unsalted butter, cut into small pieces
  • 8 ounces grated cheddar cheese
  • 3-4 Tbsp. water
  1. Pulse the flour, salt, pepper, and smoked paprika in a food processor, then add the butter and pulse until the mixture resembles coarse meal.  Add the grated cheese a little at a time until the mixture again resembles coarse meal.
  2. Pulse in 3 to 4 tablespoons of water, one tablespoon at a time, and only enough so that the dough forms a ball and rides the blade.
  3. Remove the cracker dough, wrap it in plastic, and chill for 20 minutes or up to 24 hours.
  4. Preheat the oven to 350° F.
  5. Roll the dough out to 1/8th-inch thickness directly onto a baking sheet covered with parchment paper.  (You can cover the dough with plastic wrap to keep it from sticking to the rolling pin.)  Using a pizza or pie cutter, cut 1 inch squares, separate them slightly, and  bake at 350° F for 15-20 minutes or until crackers are golden brown.
  6. Remove from the oven. Store in an airtight container for up to one week.  They probably won’t last that long!
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Beef and Green Olive Tagine

Matthew:  I think I first learned of tagine back in high school French class when we had a vocabulary unit on Morocco.  The textbook had an illustration of an outdoor market in which there was a funny looking ceramic dish and a plate of couscous with raisins.  The funny looking dish, called a tagine, helps to trap moisture inside (which is useful in the desert), by having water condense on the sloped sides.  I haven’t purchased a tagine yet, so I thought I would try making this recipe from the Stay at Stove Dad blog in a slow cooker.  For the recipe, I purchased some organic, grass-fed beef stew meat from the co-op.  It was expensive, but really good quality beef.  The tagine spices (cinnamon, turmeric, cayenne, paprika, and ginger) didn’t overwhelm the dish, but instead created a subtle, exotic flavor which paired nicely with the green olives.  I hope to make this again and perhaps experiment with other tagine recipes in the future.