Category Archives: Soup

Cheese Olive Herb Bread & Mushroom Brie Soup

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It all started with the need to use up our Brie cheese.  I found 2 good looking recipes on Pinterest.  I decided to made this soup.  Some modifications that I made were to put the onions in the oven to caramelize as well as the mushrooms.  I did not have enough room on one cookie sheet so I used 2, 1 for the mushrooms and 1 for the onions.  I used a little less butter than called for to cook the garlic and make the roux.  And I just used fat-free milk not cream.  The soup was creamy and delicious!

For the bread, I sauteed an onion until golden and toasty to add to the bread dough. I did not put the sundried tomatoes in.  For the herbs, I used dried thyme and some Penzeys herb mixture.  Very good bread- moist and flavorful!!  Yummy with the olives, cheese, onion and herbs!

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Italian Wedding Soup

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With frigid, below zero temperatures, I wanted to make a warm, hearty soup.  I followed this recipe for the most part.  For the meatball meat portion, I combined 1 pound of lean, ground turkey and 1/2 pound pork sausage and then froze half of them.  I did add some mushrooms that were leftover which added flavor and texture.  Next time, I would add more mushrooms and shredded carrots.  I would also add the spinach at the very end.  Very tasty!!!

Roasted Garlic and Beet Soup

Katie:  Since I’m on my own for meals this week, I decided to take the opportunity to try a few new recipes. It was chilly here today, so I decided to make some soup.  I found this recipe for Roasted Garlic and Beet Soup from Martha Stewart.  It took awhile to roast the beets, but otherwise this soup was really simple to make.  I forgot to add the lemon juice, but it still tasted great.  I ate it with a dollop of ricotta, which was the perfect accompaniment!

Roasted Garlic and Beet Soup (slightly adapted from Whole Living)

  • 3 medium beets
  • olive oil
  • 6 unpeeled garlic cloves
  • 1 large leek, thinly sliced
  • 1 teaspoon Italian herbs
  • 1 bay leaf
  • salt and pepper, to taste
  1. Heat oven to 400 degrees F.  Drizzle beets with olive oil and roast in parchment-lined foil for 1 hour or until tender.  Drizzle the garlic cloves with oil (I roasted a whole head), wrap in foil, and roast for 30-40 minutes.  Unwrap beets, let cool, peel, and quarter.  (Be careful not to get the juice on your clothes!) Squeeze garlic from skin. Set aside.
  2. Heat 2 teaspoons olive oil in a pot over medium heat. Add the leek and cook, stirring, until tender, about 6 to 8 minutes. Add beets and garlic, the herbs, the bay leaf, and 3 cups water.  Season with salt and pepper.
  3. Bring to a boil, then reduce heat and simmer for 5 minutes. Remove the bay leaf. Let the soup cool slightly, then transfer to a blender and puree.  Adjust the seasonings to taste.  Serve with ricotta cheese or sour cream, as desired.

To go with my soup, I decided to use some leftover salmon in quesadillas.  I followed this recipe for Salmon and Kale Quesadillas, which turned out great!  If I made them again, I might try added other spices or some tomatoes, but I really enjoyed this combination of flavors.

Peanut Stew

Matthew:  After the great beef stew, it was time to try something a little different.  Erika recommended this recipe for Inner Warmth Peanut Stew, from Matt Moyer, executive chef at The Great Dane.  The list of ingredients might seem a little strange–butternut squash, tomatoes, peanut butter, garlic, and ginger–but the combination really tastes good.  I was a little hesitant to add 1/2 cup of ginger, but I went for it.  I really enjoyed this stew.  It made quite a bit and I ended up freezing half of it, but after I finished the first half I thawed the other half to eat right away.  I highly recommend this recipe if you are tired of the more traditional winter soups and stews, but still want something warm and filling.  Two small changes I made were to use chunky peanut butter and to add some cinnamon.

Irish Beef Stew

Matthew:  Even though the weather has been unusually warm, I’ve been busy making lots of winter foods, especially stews.  I love making stews because everything goes in one pot and once you get them simmering, you are practically done.  I found this recipe for Irish beef stew and the result was very good.  It uses Guinness and red wine, making it extra flavorful.  I found some nice grass-fed organic beef and beef stock concentrate at the co-op to use in the stew.  The end result was delicious and I could have eaten it every day for weeks.  I’ll have to make some more soon!

Pumpkin Black Bean Soup

Katie:  You can never have too much pumpkin!

I was pleasantly surprised with an extremely simple black bean soup recipe recently, so when I saw this pumpkin version on Closet Cooking, I knew I had to try it!  It was a perfect blend of onion, garlic, black beans, diced tomatoes, pumpkin puree, a bit of sherry, and cumin and chili powder.  The addition of pumpkin made it slightly sweet and very rich.  It was great topped with sour cream and cilantro!

Pumpkin Black Bean Soup (slightly adapted from Closet Cooking)

yield:  4 servings

  • 1 teaspoon olive oil
  • 1 onion, chopped
  • 4 cloves garlic, minced
  • 2 teaspoons ground cumin
  • 2 teaspoons ground chili powder
  • salt and pepper to taste
  • 4 cups vegetable broth
  • 2 cups pumpkin puree
  • 2 (15 ounce) cans black beans, rinsed and drained
  • 1 (14 ounce) can diced tomatoes
  • 1/4 cup dry Sherry (or dry white wine)
  • cilantro (chopped, optional)
  • sour cream (optional)
  1. Heat oil in a nonstick pan over medium-high heat.
  2. Add the onions and saute until tender, about 5 minutes.
  3. Add  the garlic, cumin, chili powder, salt and pepper and saute until fragrant, about a minute.
  4. Transfer to a cooking pot and add the broth, pumpkin, black beans, tomatoes and sherry.  Simmer for 25-30 minutes.
  5. Remove from heat and puree carefully until you reach the desired consistency.  Add extra liquid (water) if it gets too thick.
  6. Serve with cilantro and sour cream.  Enjoy!

Red Kuri Soup

Matthew:  On a whim about a month ago, I bought an unfamiliar squash at a local farm.  After some research, I was able to identify it as a red kuri squash.  I wasn’t exactly sure what to use it for, but fortuitously I came upon a recipe for Beatrix’s Red Kuri Soup in the cookbook Around My French Table by Dorie Greenspan.  The cookbook has tons of amazing French recipes, several of which I am excited to try out.  The soup recipe was amazingly easy.  You just gut the squash and chop into pieces, leaving the skin on.  Then, you throw in a couple leeks,  simmer in milk and water, and then puree the mixture.  It turns out wonderfully smooth and is delicious with the plain yogurt, granny smith apple, and toasted walnuts toppings.  I’m glad I splurged and bought really high quality whole milk because I think you can really taste the difference.  I’ll be interested in using kuri squash for other recipes.  It has a lot more flavor than your ordinary squash and I think it could go quite well in many dishes.